Virginibus Puerisque, and Other Papers

By Robert Louis

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...Transcribed from the 1897 Chatto & Windus edition by David Price, email
ccx074@pglaf.org





...

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...seemed
to taunt him with his fifty years and fair round belly.

The fact is, we are...

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...his moral being. It
is not only when Lydgate misallies himself with Rosamond Vincy, but...

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...this be love at all, it is plain the poets
have been fooling with mankind since...

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...internal
accomplishments, I have reason to speak still more highly of them: good
sense without vanity, a...

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...is to be sought for. It would be trying, for
instance, to keep bed and...

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...Sometimes, alas! the
calmest man is carried away in the torrent, bandies adjectives with the
best, and...

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...much matter although she is talented in nothing
else. She must know her _métier de...

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...on public business. It will
wash. It will find something to say at an...

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...marry if it is a marriage of love, for
absences are a good influence in love...

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...the instant,
what we have all dreamed on summer Sundays when the bells ring, or at
night...

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...and first beginnings of the march.
There is our true base; that is not only the...

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...them, you have seen and desired the good that you were
not able to accomplish; like...

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...a ticket-of-leave man through
a dangerous pass; you have eternally missed your way in life, with
consequences...

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...their part in life
before those marble eyes. A god watched them at the board,...

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...into the rabbi of precision; and after these years of
ragged practice, pose for a hero...

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...wanted
for the education of young men. That doctrine of the excellence of
women, however chivalrous,...

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...led into temptation; but not lawful to skulk from those that come
to us. The...

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...Nay, you
will be I wisely glad that you retain the sense of blemishes; for the
faults...

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...are tempted to think as supernatural, in our
trite and reasonable world. The effect is...

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...to the purpose) strong, healthy,
high-strung, and generous natures, of whom the reverse might have been
expected....

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...existence
of any enjoyment which was out of his reach; and thus he turned his back
upon...

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...and within
sight of the City of Love. There let him sit awhile to hatch...

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...happiness, would serve at least to keep love
generous and great-hearted. Nor is it quite...

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...in a merely personal sense exists no
longer. The lover takes a perilous pleasure in...

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...that objection is that
jealousy has not always been a character of man; formed no part...

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...analogies, we can hardly
regard it as impossible.

“The blind bow-boy,” who smiles upon us from the...

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...itself. Lies of this sort,
according to circumstances, may or may not be important; in...

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... Here
is a man opulent in both, and for lack of a medium he can...

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...lifelong and heroic literary labours” of
my fellow-men, patiently clearing up in words their loves and...

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...nor speaking gestures, nor a
responsive voice, nor yet the gift of frank, explanatory speech: people
truly...

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...for in this sort of exercise
we never hit the gold; the most that we can...

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...end define and travesty the intermediate conversation.
You never speak to God; you address a fellow-man,...

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...Understanding has in
some sort outrun knowledge, for the affection perhaps began with the
acquaintance; and as...

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...we both
think so well of our own arguments, that we very...

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...such precepts are spoken of in hyperbolical terms of
praise, and honoured with public monuments in...

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...when I was your age.” It is
not thought an answer at all, if the...

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...And in the meanwhile you
must do something, be something, believe something. It is not...

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...or that corner of knowledge, now
getting a foresight of generous possibilities, now chilled with a...

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...and take rank,
not as a prophet, but as an unteachable brat, well birched and none...

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...that hysterically moving sort of tragedy which lies on
the confines of farce. The victim...

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...many Doctor Johnsons,
to set forth upon their first romantic voyage at sixty-four. If we...

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...all men have thought so while
they were young, since there was dew in the morning...

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...into effect. There was a worm i’ the bud, a
fatal error in the premises....

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...shall
be such a mopping and a mowing at the last day, and such blushing and
confusion...

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...the other side
and demolish the generous imposture. While Calvin is putting everybody
exactly right in...

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...determination,
votes for the sixpences, and in the emphatic Americanism, it “goes for”
them. And while...

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...things besides reading grow irksome, and not a
few become impossible, by the time a man...

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...your leave.”

“Learning, quotha! After what fashion, I pray thee? Is it mathematics?”

“No, to...

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...some
really useful art: to play the fiddle, to know a good cigar, or to speak
with...

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...the hawthorn.

Extreme _busyness_, whether at school or college, kirk or market, is a
symptom of deficient...

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...is not only the person himself who suffers from his busy habits,
but his wife and...

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...should be more
beholden to your correspondent, if he had been damning you all the while
for...

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...and bitterly, in a contraction of his whole nervous
system, to discharge some temper before he...

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...Pharaoh should
set the Israelites to make a pin instead of a pyramid: and fine young...

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... And so he can enjoy
the faint autumnal splendour of the landscape, as he sees...

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...this
pleasure will not end with the anticipation, as do so many others of the
same family....

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...disenchanted
for him. He seems to himself to touch things with muffled hands, and to
see...

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...returns
of a glad activity of heart. In his lowest hours he will be stirred...

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...glad moment may have arrived on other provocations; and their
recollection may be most vivid of...

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...or sight. We admire splendid views and great
pictures; and yet what is truly admirable...

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...his imagination day after day, and is yet as
inaccessible to his feet as the clefts...

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...almost his own enjoyment; and if
there is to be no recovery; if never again will...

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...accompany his sad
decline, and follow him, with friendly voices and hopeful words, into the
very vestibule...

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...at one blow.

...

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...discharged responsibility; but the better the man and the
nobler his purposes, the more will he...

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...ceremonial, and the hired undertaker parades before the
door. All this, and much more of...

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...meal we eat, we are putting one or more of them in peril. If...

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...fear the last pinch, is irrevocable ruin. And yet we go spinning
through it all,...

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...more rigid sense, has been at the same work
for ages; and after a myriad bald...

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... When a man’s
heart warms to his viands, he forgets a great deal of sophistry,...

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...at all
abashed before the fact. A frank and somewhat headlong carriage, not
looking too anxiously...

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... “A peerage or
Westminster Abbey!” cried Nelson in his bright, boyish, heroic manner.
These are great...

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...with hope,
and their mouths full of boastful language, they should be at once
tripped up and...

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...neither art nor science,
the world is a mere arrangement of colours, or a rough footway...

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...sensibilities, with
every day; and the health of your children’s children grows as touching a
concern as...

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... O toiling hands of
mortals! O unwearied feet, travelling ye know not whither! ...

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...of our
greatest triumphs and dangers; and we are accustomed in lyrical strains
to claim it as...

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...pipe, sang his Welsh songs, and swore his queer
Welsh imprecations. There are portions of...

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...no man could it be more applicable.” Admiral in itself is
one of the most...

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..._Boxiana_, felt a more or less shamefaced satisfaction
in the exploits of prize-fighters. And the...

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...Cadiz
that the attack had been decided, he threw his hat into the sea. It...

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...there were but two courses open—either to turn her
back upon the enemy or sail through...

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...be
put into any practical difficulty from a superfluity of Greenvilles. And
besides, I demur to...

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...than
a thousand other artists when they are viewed in the body, or met in
private life;...

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...a certain death. They
were soldiers, they said, and knew well enough it was their...

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...because they liked to do things
nobly for their own satisfaction. They were giving their...

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...is not one of
those the muse delights to celebrate. Indeed it is difficult to...

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...quick to seize. He was a born
painter of portraits. He looked people shrewdly...

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...compression of the mouth, that befit and signify an
effort of the kind. The whole...

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... You can understand,
from the look of him, that sense, not so much of humour,...

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...at the
trials of Muir and Skirving in 1793 and 1794; and his appearance on these
occasions...

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...was an inhumane old gentleman (and I am afraid it is a fact that he
was...

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...are by no means of the same order of
merit. No one, of course, could...

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... Even women, who understand
men so well for practical purposes, do not know them well...

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...afterwards; something of the
swaddling numbness of infancy clings about us; we see and touch and...

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...our childhood, never to wonder, not always to
admire, but to make and modify our little...

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...came into the room and nonchalantly inquired if I had
seen his bow and arrow. ...

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...they never go in the same direction nor so much as
lie in the same element....

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...of young men
and the love of mothers, the business man’s pleasure in method, all these
and...

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...piece of play still left within our reach,
is not entirely satisfying, and is even apt...

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...furious,
as the last corner of safe ground was cut off on all sides and grew
smaller...

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...a cloudy Olympus, following unknown
designs apart from rational enjoyment? who profess the tenderest
solicitude for children,...

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...what he
has seen into bewildering fiction; and that he cares no more for what you
call...

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...with which the march begins at morning,
and the peace and spiritual repletion of the evening’s...

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...a pipe for any
wind to play upon. “I cannot see the wit,” says Hazlitt,...

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...and gesticulating to himself.
His face changes from time to time, as indignation flashes from his...

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...object to in these words of his, one thing in
the great master’s practice that seems...

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...shade. You sink into
yourself, and the birds come round and look at you; and...

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...night, and after dinner, that the best hour comes. There
are no such pipes to...

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...an old tale.

Or perhaps you are left to your own company for the night, and...

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...degrees of
the infinitesimally small, such as a tobacco pipe or the Roman Empire, a
million of...

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...hearts of upland ploughmen.
And the Greeks, in so figuring, uttered the last word of human
experience....

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...rejoicing. But
let him feign never so carefully, there is not a man but has...

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...the mind refuses to be satisfied with evolution,
and demands a ruddier presentation of the sum...

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...eyes; and as he paced forth in the ghostly darkness, carrying
his own sun by a...

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...than Jupiter himself. It is true, again, that
they did not unfold their rays with...

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...here is a crumb of consolation;
consolatory, at least, to such of them as look out...